Boxer

Boxer

Dog Facts

Type:
Working
Energy:
High energy
Exercise Requirement:
Medium
Affection Level:
Very affectionate
Protection:
Fairly protective
Size:
Large
Grooming Maintenance:
Low
Temperature Preference:
Temperate
Typical Lifespan:
8-10 years

About the Boxer Breed

The Boxer is both agile and strong. It is very muscular and square in proportion. It has a good ground-covering gait. The head of the dog is fairly distinctive, with a short, broad muzzle and slightly hanging jowls. It tends to have an underbite, and folds in the face running down from the root of the muzzle. The Boxer sometimes has cropped ears, although they are also often left natural nowadays, depending on the restrictions to cropping in each individual country, and by aesthetic demand. The Boxer can also have its tail docked. Its naturally muscular physique is accentuated by the short coat, something which helps make it intimidating when working as a watchdog.

The short, shiny coat is usually fawn or brindle, with a white underbelly and feet. The white often extends up to the dog's chin and even face, contrasting the normally blackened muzzle.

Originally bred from two breeds used to hunt down large game like bulls which no longer exist (the Brabenter Bullenbaiser and the Danzinger Bullenbaiser, with bullenbaiser literally meaning "bull biter"), the boxer is suited to clamping onto large animals and hanging on. Speedy enough to catch up, agile enough to leap on, and a perfectly formed head to grip tightly with the muzzle, yet still breathe through the recessed nose. The dog was then used in bull baiting, a popular sport which eventually got outlawed. The dog, with no other purpose, then became popular with German butchers to keep their cattle in line.

The boxer is playful and inquisitive, a good addition to an active family. However, coming from such a strong background, it has a stubborn streak, which can usually be overcome with simple training.

It requires daily mental and physical exercise, but can probably be satiated with a long walk on a leash, rather than having to let it off. It doesn't like hot weather, and is better suited to life indoors, or, preferably, with the freedom to divide its time between a house and a garden. It can be prone to snoring and only needs occasional brushing to remove the dead hairs from its short coat.

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